Massachusetts Projects

 

History UnErased

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Integrating LGBTQ Content for Elementary, Middle and High School Classrooms Using Library of Congress Primary and Secondary Sources History UnErased, Inc. (HUE) hosts three-day workshop sessions at Lowell National Historical Park in Lowell, Massachusetts entitled Reimagining Equality in Our Classrooms, Culture and Consciousness. K-12 classroom teachers (including ELL and SPED), administrators, librarians, and staff engage in the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) history using primary and secondary sources from Library of Congress and ONE Archives Foundation at USC Library's visual history exhibits.

The first day provides initial learning of LGBTQ history with expert historians and archivists using TPS resources and ONE Archives Foundation visual history exhibits. The second day provides a well-facilitated program that addresses common miscues or problems teachers and students may have when engaging with LGBTQ history and content, as well as a tour of the Library of Congress website with expert educators and curriculum designers. Finally, the third day provides collaborative time for participants to work with TPS resources as participants connect LGBTQ history with requisite frameworks and standards.


Leventhal Map Center at Boston Public Library

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Revolution: Mapping the Road to Independence, in partnership with the Boston Public Schools (BPS), history/social studies content specialists, and LMC staff created educational materials that utilize primary sources from the LMC world-class cartographic collection and the Library of Congress website to study the American Revolutionary War era. Key maps were selected and classroom activities and lessons tied to units in grades 2-5 and 10 were created. Beginning in 2015, LMC in partnership with a variety of Boston historical institutions, offers a week-long summer institute for teachers, as well as a fellowship program for two teachers to work with Leventhal and Library of Congress collections to develop curriculum for use in their classrooms.

Maps Tell Stories: The American Revolution professional development activity created by Michelle LeBlanc

Map Set 1: Unrest in Boston, 1765-1776

Map Set 2: Britain's North American Empire 1607-1764


SEEM Collaborative

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Bringing Science and the Arts Alive with Primary Source Materials provides multi-level training for K-12 educators in utilizing the Library of Congress' primary source analysis tools and database of primary sources as well as incorporating best practices to support literacy instruction in the content areas of science and the arts.

Level One training is modeled on The University of the Arts' "Teaching with Primary Sources from Local Collections & the Library of Congress" program. Educators spend the week exploring local primary sources through a series of trips to local historical sites, museums, and archives, with a focus on identifying various types of primary sources that can be used to enrich curriculum. During Level Two training, educators use primary source materials to study a specific subject area—such as the Jazz Age—that provide instruction in developing a methodology for conducting primary source research using the loc.gov, incorporating primary source materials into subject area lessons, and contextualizing primary source materials so that students can make connections and draw conclusions. In both levels, educators then incorporate principles of Understanding by Design (UBD) to develop units that integrate primary sources, informational reading, and writing that align with Common Core and state standards. Train-the-trainer sessions help sustain and expand learning across districts, subject matter areas, and grade levels, and address a specific classroom needs.


SEEM Collaborative's Getting to the "Core" of Literacy Using Primary Source Documents TPS project is designed to strengthen instructional pedagogy and teacher research skills across subject areas, provide students with the literacy skills needed for success in school and at work, and create a flexible and sustainable framework for ongoing, multi-district professional development.

Teachers use primary source materials to study a specific subject area, such as "America and the World: Immigration and Imperialism," that provide instruction in developing a methodology for conducting primary source research using the Library of Congress database, incorporating primary source materials into subject area lessons, and contextualizing primary source materials so that students can make connections and draw conclusions. Using the Massachusetts model curriculum units as a guide, teachers incorporate principles of Understanding by Design to develop units that integrate primary sources, informational reading, and writing that align with the Common Core and meet state standards.


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The Power to Proclaim: The Impact of Presidential Proclamations on American Life, 1789-2010, is a Teaching with Primary Sources 21st Century Skills Project that uses a collaborative teacher/librarian professional development activity between the National Forum on Information Literacy and North Cambridge Catholic High School (NCCHS), an inner city college preparatory/work study high school. A national model, NCCHS, is a member of the Cristo Rey Network, an association of 24 college preparatory high schools across the country in which students work to earn tuition and gain real world experience.

The theme for this 21st century skills TPS project is The Power to Proclaim: The Impact of Presidential Proclamations on American Life, 1789-2010. The primary aim of this project is to introduce NCCHS instructional faculty to the 21st century information/digital literacy skill set needed to design and implement a guided inquiry teaching and learning process that enables high school students to critically and creatively use the primary sources of the Library of Congress. Preparing students and teachers for the new demands of the 21st century Information Society underscores the importance of utilizing the combined skill set of information/digital literacy and applying that skill set across the broad spectrum of academic and workplace teaching and learning. The Teaching with Primary Sources Program offers the ideal context in which to successfully advance the information and digital literacy skills of both teachers and students alike.


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The End of Slavery: Documents and Dilemmas uses twenty documents from the Library of Congress From Slavery to Freedom digitized collections and twenty documents from the MHS African Americans and the End of Slavery and Images of the Antislavery Movement in Massachusetts digitized collections to develop educational materials for teachers based on both institutions' resources. Working with Boston-area teachers, curriculum units are created and available through the MHS website. These materials are the core of a full array of professional development programs for educators, including primary source-based workshops and conference presentations with partners at local and national conferences for historians and educators. MHS also hosts teacher fellows in three different programs each year, and a teacher fellowship was devoted to expanding curricula around what has already been developed for this project, incorporating new documents from the collections of both repositories.

Project Website


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Thinking Like a Historian: Primary Sources for Primary Students is an online course focusing on immigration history, a topic that is integral to the elementary social studies framework in Massachusetts and other New England states. We seek to develop and increase elementary classroom teachers' understanding of what a primary source is and how their students can benefit from observing and analyzing primary sources, knowledge of best instructional practices for helping their students learn from primary sources, capacity and confidence to find, select and utilize diverse primary sources in their social studies lesson plans/curriculum, and knowledge of the resources available online through the Library of Congress and other historical institutions for teaching the history of immigration in the elementary curriculum.

Lesson plans created by project participants:
Immigration and Ellis Island created by Betty Carhart
The Intersection of Immigration, Women's Rights, and the Labor Movement New York, early 1900s created by Jennifer Mason
Mexican Immigration created by Mary Ellen Hart

Article by Jennifer Hanson, Librarian "Tips for Making Online Professional Development Work for You" appearing in Volume 2, Number 3 of The Scanner Newsletter.


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Primary Sources: A Window to the Past supports the use of primary sources from the Library of Congress in ways that foster critical and creative thinking and a love of history. Initially, teachers and librarians participate in experiences that address the Teaching with Primary Sources Program (TPS) Level I goals and some of the Level II goals that are connected to the MA Curriculum Framework. Primary Sources: A Window to the Past establishes a Level III network within the Collaborative member districts. This project also addresses an objective specified by many of our school district members which entails supporting active student learning with technology. The proposed workshops foster teacher use of primary source images and video segments in a whole class activity in ways that capture the very visual student audience of today.
Project Ongoing Professional Development Programs


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Being There: Primary Sources in the Classroom provides face-to-face and on-line professional development workshops for teachers and librarians. These workshops introduce participants to the wealth of primary sources, lesson plans, programs, and virtual workshops available through the Library of Congress and teaches them skills to effectively search and access appropriate materials to use with their classes.

The program provides professional development workshops for Martha's Vineyard educators and librarians in accessing and using primary sources to teach. It also provides classroom support for teachers who develop and test curriculum materials using primary sources. The project is presented in three phases, targeting two groups of participants. The project utilizes the technology labs and classroom spaces in the schools to present the workshops.

 


Content created and featured in partnership with the TPS program does not indicate an endorsement by the Library of Congress. Website Images Bibliographic Information